Parsey McParseface and I have been getting acquainted because it is the intersection of language and artificial intelligence. Mr. “McParsedoes what most elementary school students do”, which is safe to say I may fail at being good at this. If learning about how computers can understand basic language makes you smile, check it out here in the Washington Post.

Cannabis – it’ll still waft all up in your house and lodge in your nose hole, but today, it wears fancy pants and a top hat, as it struts around with a hand made cane, looking down its snubby thin nose which has been broken in several places by well aimed punches, at its lovers. Well, not really but if you pay $100 to visit this high end boutique in San Francisco, you may want to dress it up a bit. I wonder how much business has skyrocketed for the bars and restaurants close by…

This week’s hump day haul included a small stash of reds – some were highly rated bargain deals and others were a little more but not “break the bank” bottles. They included a zinfandel from Rombauer Vineyards (The cabernet sauvignon is very good too but quote a few pennies more) a Paxis red blend (that I picked up right away because of the rating and the adorable bulldog on the label!), a Sur de los Andes Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon blend (that I’ve never had) and another delish Cab from Liberty School. 

Cheers!

 

​”Trying to fit a social construct when you’re not part of that social group to begin with, means you’ve already failed. Put your energy elsewhere. People from all ethnicities, genders, sexual orientation and abilities will let you down because they’re people. Some with the mightiest agendas and hordes of followers are the first to fall because they start believing their own greatness. All heros are assholes at some point. Buddha wasn’t always the Buddha, Mother Teresa didn’t value all groups equally, Gandhi tested himself by using others including young girls, and so on. Too many want a hero so they blindly trust. Worship no one and trust no human who tells you how to…” – 

-Conversations with my father. 

Conversations with my father…

Posted: September 1, 2016 in Uncategorized

​”Trying to fit a social construct when you’re not part of that social group to begin with, means you’ve already failed. Put your energy elsewhere. People from all ethnicities, genders, sexual orientation and abilities will let you down because they’re people. Some with the mightiest agendas and hordes of followers are the first to fall because they start believing their own greatness. All heros are assholes at some point. Buddha wasn’t always the Buddha, Mother Teresa didn’t value all groups equally, Gandhi tested himself by using others including young girls, and so on. Too many want a hero so they blindly trust. Worship no one and trust no human who tells you how to…” – 

-Conversations with my father. 

Big Time, Baby!

Posted: June 21, 2016 in Humor
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Recently, we won a few dollars on lottery tickets. I, like so many others, now have codes to get free tickets because Ticketmaster ripped us off for years, and in another settlement, Apple and Amazon settled a lawsuit which “gifts” me money to spend on books. Books!! I squealed loudest when I found out I could get more books!

All of this leads me to believe that I’ve now been properly trained and practiced in the art of the squeal and of happiness that comes with unexpected money (regardless of how much I paid to “earn” said money; don’t burst my bubble). Therefore, I await my next big lottery ticket windfall. I’m ready, y’all! I’m now worthy.😉

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Silent Americans have an impact. If you’re not voting because your candidate is not on the ballot, you are still making a statement and this statement has an impact and consequences.

Of course I hope everyone who can vote, votes. I’m openly biased against the likely Republican party’s nominee and I’m okay in my soul with this. Hence my plea.

Abstaining from the process, no matter the reason, has an impact on the outcome. If you aren’t thrilled about the options, take a minute to think about how we got here. Once you have that answer, ask, “How can I work towards changing what I don’t like?”. This simple question is useful in so many areas of our lives so don’t limit yourself to using it only for politics. Let’s use voices, actions and ballots to make a difference and not become the laughing stock of the world with a mad man at the helm. Focus on making your life  better – whatever that picture of contentment looks like to you.

Oh, and if you still want to abstain, just a reminder from the ACLU about your voting rights and how at one time in the past, some had none. If you’re a woman voting for Trump, don’t forget how fragile your candidate’s ego is, and that you have your very own woman card…

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License to Live

Posted: April 25, 2016 in Awake, Wonderful Humans
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You know what and who you are. Often, the world makes you someone else or makes you want to be someone different – someone unlike who you are. What’s your truth? What’s your story? Which box are you in? Who put you in that box? (paraphrased from Geena Rocero’s TED Talk)

 I used to think that my family was special, wonderful, and loving – even though, not openly. For example, I didn’t like to be touched, or hugged as a kid. I still cringe a bit when people stand too close to me, but that’s not the point of this post. The point of this post is that not everyone is as fortunate to have a life like Geena’s, a family as loving as Geena’s, and most importantly, self-love.

Do you? Do you create the type of environment that is loving and nurturing?

What’s your “License to Live”?

Take a listen to the beautiful Ted Talk by @GeenaRocero: https://www.ted.com/speakers/geena_rocero

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White Male (WM): “There are more important things in the world and we’re worried about our graphics not being representative enough of all?”

Me: “It’s important to see everyone reflected in our endeavors so no one is left out. Let’s make the people a different color and not have all of the men in the imag shown as the boss because we have several female leaders in this organization. Maybe let’s just use another image altogether instead of people?”

WM: “Yeah, more important things in the world like the Freddie Gray trial, and people dying than caring if we’re universally liked or not, but yeah this is important.”

While I agree that there are many important things in the world to worry about and to remedy, and that they should be addressed, I can’t help but think about how seemingly small details create issues where those who not represented, not heard, not included, rage against the machine and those in positions of authority.

When you do not see anyone in positions of aithority who looks like you or sounds like you, or when you’re in a community that feels neglected and worse, when your community is recognized, but only it’s only for negative aspects, it can be disheartening. It also leads many to feel as if no matter how far they get or how hard they try, the system is against them.

Take for example, your church or your school system. These are life-altering and life-shaping organizations. When your teachers, principals, priests, pastors and other religious leaders do not reflect you as a human or those similar to you – from the physical appearance, to the way you speak, laugh, live, etc. – will you feel included or neglected? Will you truly believe that by being yourself, looking, speaking, laughing, and living as yourself, you will be accepted and able to step onto that path to becoming a successful member of society and the world as a whole?

Of couse many have thrived in environments where they are neglected because they are determined and they fought hard to beat the odds. However, when you feel welcomed, cherished and appreciated for who you are, that’s immeasurable, not to mention, makes life a little more pleasant. When you see others like you who may have had similar experiences, you may believe that if that person can do it, so can you. See, it’s all about creating stronger and healthier humans.

Don’t believe me? Ask minorities how they felt to see the first Black President of the United States elected and sworn in to office. 

P.S. Of course, not everyone who looks like, and sounds like us, are for us. But those turncoats, haters and Uncle Ruckuses will be discussed in a separate post. This post is about being seen, being represented and knowing that we all have a shot at greatness.